Flows to Bay

Flows to Bay

 

“Flows to Bay” explores the relationship between consumerism and the ocean. Almost everything we purchase, use and enjoy at some point is tossed away and ends up as trash – either in a landfill or worse – along the side of the road or in our bays, lakes, streams and ultimately the oceans.

A Night With Brandon Boyd – December 15, 2012

 

On December 15, Brandon Boyd of Incubus visited the Museum of Monterey to spotlight the Flows to Bay exhibit, which features some of Brandon’s art. Thanks to Brandon for spending his time with us, and to everyone who attended and made the event a fantastic success!

Read Brandon’s write-up about the event.

Event Photos

 

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Exhibit Photos

 

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Exhibit Information Continued

 

Of all the common detritus of our lives that literally “flows to bay,” the most insidious is plastic. From land, plastic is carried to the ocean in rivers or drains, swept from the beach by waves and surf, or blown offshore by winds, especially during heavy storms. Plastic bottles have a life span of approximately 450 years. As they break down in the water, they turn into minute particles that are ingested by marine life – from phytoplankton to turtles to seabirds on Midway Island. All this ingested plastic affects the food chain all the way up to us. Harmful chemicals leached by plastics are already present in the tissue and bloodstream of everyone, including newborns. Plastic bags and other plastic garbage thrown into the ocean kill as many as 1 million sea creatures a year.

The artists in “Flows to Bay” are an example of a growing number of concerned and vocal people who have actively decided to pursue this issue as their subject matter. From diverse locations and with a variety of materials and ideas, they serve as apocalyptic visionaries of our disposable society.

This exhibition was inspired by the efforts of the Plastic Pollution Coalition and the artists who support them. PPC is a global alliance of individuals, businesses and organizations working together to end plastic pollution and its toxic impacts on people, animals and the environment and stands for every person’s right to air, water and food without toxic chemicals.

The artists in “Flows to Bay” are an example of a growing number of concerned and vocal people who have actively decided to pursue this issue as their subject matter.  From diverse locations and with a variety or materials and ideas, they serve as apocalyptic visionaries of our disposable society.

PLASTIC POLLUTION COALITION

The Flows To Bay exhibition was inspired by the efforts of the Plastic Pollution Coalition and the artists who support them.  PPC is a global alliance of individuals, businesses and organizations working together to end plastic pollution and its toxic impacts on people, animals and the environment and stands for every person’s right to air, water and food without toxic chemicals.
Plastic Pollution Coalition

Lisa Coscino

ABOUT THE CURATOR

Lisa Coscino and FAME-media: Lisa Coscino opened her gallery in Pacific Grove in 2000.  Last year Lisa teamed up with Kate Miller to create FAME- Media: FilmArtMusicEarth, a hybrid production company dedicated to helping conservation-based non-profits extend their message through the Arts.  F.A.M.E.-Media helps non-profits become sustainable through creative, innovative and interactive platforms. FAME Media

 

 

 

 

 

PROGRAMMING
Programming for “Flows to Bay” will include performances, film screenings, lectures, discussions, book readings and signings by artists, authors, filmmakers and musicians who are investigating the health of our waters and helping to find simple solutions that we can incorporate into our daily lives.

Artists

 

Brandon Boyd

BRANDON BOYD

As a surfer, Brandon is interested in the ocean. But the thing that occupies his mind most vividly is the issue of sustainability; in every sense of the word. He believes ‘sustainability’, as a concept, is one of the arteries leading to the heart of so many of our cultural transitions at play today. And it’s this concept which leads him to think about bottled water, and its multibillion dollar industry. Brandon believes his art is a reminder, of sorts, so that we know how dangerous and unsustainable our habits are.  More on Brandon Boyd:

Brandon Boyd Hurley

EVAN BLACKWELLEvan Blackwell

Evan has consistently been making things with materials from his surroundings as a way to comprehend, as well as bring order and new meanings to the world we live in. At the very core of his research is a desire to create a harmony between the reality of his urban existence and his own personal ideology. His methods for doing this are to collect, rearrange and repurpose the materials and spaces around him. Translating everyday things into poignant forms of expression of our time; similar to a kind of alchemy, he believes this process helps him overcome the limits of social constraints.

Evan Blackwell  Benham VisionHero

MATTHEW CHASE-DANIELMatthew Chase-Daniel

Matthew uses photo-assemblage to create large composite landscapes that capture what he calls “the elongated experience of seeing” the world that surrounds us. He composes in two distinct phases-first by photographing extensively in the field, and second by editing and arranging the photographs to form a larger whole. Multiple images are assembled to create a composite nonlinear landscape that captures the artist’s whole experience of the place he has chosen to photograph.

Matthew Chase-Daniel visit

Dianna Cohen

DIANNA COHEN

Los Angeles-based multi-media visual artist, painter and curator Dianna Cohen is best known for her two-dimensional and three-dimensional works using recycled plastic bags – sewn together – ranging from small hanging pieces to room-sized installations. In 2007, Cohen expanded into making wearable art pieces using recycled materials, including stage outfits worn by alt-rock duo The Ditty Bops and a “green carpet” dress worn by actress Rachelle Carson. Dianna is Creative Director & co-founder of Plastic Pollution Coalition, a global alliance of individuals, organizations and businesses working together to stop plastic pollution and its toxic impacts on humans, animals and the environment.

Dianna Cohen visit –  Plastic Pollution Coalition

DAVID EDGARDavid Edgar

As a sculptor, David’s work has always been strongly informed by the 20th century tradition of found object assembly. Perhaps, in the context of a mid-life catharsis, he recently interrupted over 25 years of working in steel, and began making decorative artworks from recyclable detergent bottles. With quality of craft being an
important issue, David finds that making recycled plastic art truly energizes his creative spirit, and one of the results are the marine creatures of the Plastiquarium.  More:

David Edgar Plastiquarium

Sam Hisey

SAM HISEY

Sam grew up and currently resides in Carmel, CA.  Her vision is to create artwork that mimics urban graffiti art found on the side of buildings and such, but set to canvas so as to be suitable for the home or any interior space. Sam has been creating artwork for over 15 years and has explored just about every medium imaginable. But over the past few years it has all come down to the spray can for her. Sam is very close to the Monterey Bay area since she grew up here. Working with the ocean and its creatures as her subjects has renewed her love for the Peninsula and all that it contains, and most importantly has reminded her how precious these things are, and how they should be thought about and preserved.

Sam Hisey The Factory

Chris Jordan

CHRIS JORDAN

“Running the Numbers” looks at contemporary American culture through the austere lens of statistics. Each image portrays a specific quantity of something: 15 million sheets of office paper (five minutes of paper use); 106,000 aluminum cans (thirty seconds of can consumption) one million plastic cups (the number used on airline flights in the US every six hours), and so on. This project visually examines these vast and bizarre measures of our society, in large intricately detailed prints assembled from thousands of smaller photographs. Employing these themes, Chris hopes to raise questions about the roles and responsibilities we each play as individuals in a collective that is increasingly enormous, incomprehensible, and overwhelming.

Chris Jordan galleryPlastic Cups

Judith Lang

JUDITH SELBY & RICHARD LANG

Judith and Richardstarted collecting plastic debris—carrying it away by the bagful— all from Kehoe Beach, a remote stretch of the Point Reyes National Seashore, in Northern California. Certain items would catch their interest: milk jug lids, combs, toy soldiers, disposable lighters, cheese spreaders from lunch snack packs. The plastic they continue to find is not left by visitors; it is washing up from the ocean. They clean, sort and categorize the pieces according to color and kind and use it  to makeartworks including large sculptures, installations, photo tableaus and jewelry.  More:

Judith Selby & Richard Lang Shore Stories

PAM LONGOBARDIPam Longobardi

Pam’s current project Drifters focuses on the global issue of marine debris and plastics in the ocean. She has been working on installations and public artworks that address the interconnectedness of the land and sea, between humans and the ocean biosphere. She collected the material in these works as it washed in from the Pacific Basin onto the South Point of Hawaii, the southernmost part of the United States; both amazed and shocked by the visual impact of the astonishing array of marine debris she encountered.She believes this artwork can function to raise awareness and transform behavior, while providing a provocative visual delight.  More on the Drifters Project:

Pam Longobardi visit

Trevor Meeker

TREVOR MEEKER

In Big Sur, Trevor assembles his metal paintings from recycled tin and found wood.  “There is a satisfying feeling that comes with creating art which is about a bygone era, where every little scrap was saved and recycled into something else,” says Trevor. Trevor’s subjects range from products such as vintage telephones and radios to wild cityscapes where the collaged elements capture the frenetic rhythm of daily life in our consumer based society.

Trevor Meeker visit

RAYMOND PETTIBONRaymond Pettibon

A cult figure among underground music devotees for his early work associated with the Los Angeles punk rock scene, Pettibon has acquired an international reputation as one of the foremost contemporary American artists working with drawing, text, and artist’s books. Pettibon is as likely to explore the subject of surfing as he is typography; themes from art history and nineteenth-century literature appear in the same breath with American politics from the 1960s and contemporary pop culture.  More:

Raymond Pettibon wiki

Lila Roo

LILA ROO

Birthed from a lineage of wild, Lila Roo is a gypsy. From deserts to jungles to seas, she uses art as a constant in her transience. Her art is an experiential and physical act, blending body and material into nature. Her body is animal and her materials are food, symbolic of the world’s resources, making adornment and nest to reflect beauty & pain, life & death. Painfully, plastic garbage is the most plentiful resource in our natural world and so she strips it to shreds, braids it to rope and searches for settings to command it.

Lila Roovisit

SUSAN THACKERSusan Thacker

Most of Susan’s paintings are allegories for personal, political, cultural and moral questions she has regarding our time on earth. In an aerial series of paintings, she distances herself to see if there’s a pattern as to why people converge or disperse. In other paintings she submerges herself below the surface to explore the underbelly that is her imagination. Often she employs symbols to communicate larger issues. In all her paintings, she likes to tell just enough of the story that the viewer makes up the ending.

Susan Thacker portfolio